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Advisory Committee

DRS has a small group of special advisors who represent different sectors of the arts and academic community and give valuable support and advice to the organisation.

Ramsay Burt

Ramsay Burt is Professor of Dance History at De Montfort University, UK. His publications include The Male Dancer: Bodies, Spectacle, Sexualities (1995, revised 2007), Alien Bodies: Representations of Modernity, ‘Race’ and Nation in Early Modern Dance (1997), Judson Dance Theater: Performative Traces (2006), with Valerie Briginshaw, Writing Dancing Together (2009), and Ungoverning Dance (forthcoming). In 2013-2014, with Professor Christy Adair, he undertook a two year funded research project into British Dance and the African Diaspora which culminated in an exhibition at the International Slavery Museum in Liverpool. With Susan Foster, he is founder editor of Discourses in Dance. In 1999 he was Visiting Professor at the Department of Performance Studies, New York University. Since 2008 he has been a regular visiting teacher at PARTS in Brussels. In 2010 he was Professeur Invité at l’Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis.

www.dmu.ac.uk/rburt

Devon Caranicas

Devon Caranicas holds a BA in Fine Arts from the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, and an MA in Contemporary Art Theory from Goldsmiths, University of London. She currently resides in New York, where she is Manager of Strategic Events at El Museo del Barrio, a leading institution for Latin American arts and culture, where she oversees an annual roster of 30+ events that are integral to the museum’s fundraising, cultivation and membership efforts. Prior to joining El Museo, Devon worked in the US, UK and Europe for a variety of interdisciplinary artists and arts organizations where she aided in production, curatorial research and grant writing. From 2012 – 2014, she served as Administrator for Dance Research Studio, where she worked closely with DRS Artistic Director Jacky Lansley to secure a 2014 Arts Council Grant used to expand the studio’s professional development and residency offerings.

http://devoncaranicas.com/

Sally Dean

Sally E. Dean (USA/UK) has been an interdisciplinary performer, performance maker and teacher over 15 years – in university, professional and community settings across Europe, Asia and the USA. Her teaching and performance work is highly informed by somatic-based practices, her cross-cultural projects in Asia and her background in both dance and theatre – integrating site, costume and object. Sally has been supported by the Arts Council England and the British Council. She leads the ‘Somatic Movement & Costume Project’ – designing costumes that create specific body-mind experiences. She is an MPhil candidate Royal Holloway University (Drama/Theatre department). Sally is on the Professional Development Programme faculty at DRS.

www.sallyedean.com | www.kolaborasi.org

Funmi Adewole

Funmi Adewole is a performer/writer, dance researcher and guest lecturer in higher education. Her research is into the development and practice of theatrical dance that draws on Africa and Diaspora dance forms. Her studio practice focuses on creativity, exploration and structured improvisation and communication. She uses movement principles and technical exercises drawn from African social dances as tools for starting points to challenge and expand the participants’ own approach to dancing. She also draws on tools from viewpoints such as Laban and physical theatre to facilitate solo dancing, collaboration and group performance. She began her career as a journalist and media practitioner in Nigeria and went into performing arts on arrival in Britain in the 1990s. Her performance credits include tours with Horse and Bamboo Mask and Puppetry Company, Ritual Arts, Adzido Pan-African Dance Ensemble, and the Chomondeleys. She performs mainly as storyteller combining text with movement in community settings, festivals and educational contexts. She began her relationship with Jacky Lansley in the late 1990s when she interviewed her for a research project on British dance. These conversations inspired her to explore the politics of the New Dance movement and the concept of studio based dance.

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